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20120916
20120916
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
of 20% of iran's call for sanctions, the united states there is a problem that iran to want to negotiate for a position which has changed -- you talk about 20% -- they want sanctions to be lifted with them stopping 20%. the question is they are enriching. we said their right to enrich should be recognized and that would negate all the u.n. sanctions. the nuclear issue stems from u.n. security council issues. within the margins of this issue, there is room to change going forward. i think we may find that it is constrained by the fact that israel is still there. israel is not about to let go of its concerns. i think there has been a lack of dialogue. it would be good if the two sides could sit down together. they could start with this temple and hold discussions and feel of how each side can help each other. my advice for the u.s. diplomats would be to sit with them and say we are not going to talk about the nuclear issue, how is your family. there is the fact of just discussing. on the other side, there is the problem that it is not clear what the endgame is. we're calling on iran to sus
the murder thursday of four american diplomates. including united states ambassador chris stevens in benghazi, libya, in what officials believe was a terrorist attack designed to coincide with the anniversary of september 11th. and joining us dan henninger, mary anastasia o'grady and, with the anti-american protests across the arab world this week, tell us about our standing in that part of the world, and the ferment in arabia? >> well, i think, paul, what's happening here is where essentially we came in when the arab spring began in egy egypt, tunisia and spread to other countries and the feeling at that time that came out the united states couldn't really support any of these movements in the arab spring because quote unquote, we don't know who these people are, which is to say that the united states, and including the state department, just was not that engaged with these countries at that time. now, when you think of how, to what extent egypt or libya since these transitions have been in the news, it's been basically not at all on their own, and still a piece with the obama administration
towards the united states and its citizens. >> schieffer: was this a long-planned attack, as far as you know. what do you know about that? >> the way this perpetrators acted, moved, and their choosing specific date for this so-called demonstration, i think we have no-- this leaves us with no doubt that this was preplanned, predetermined. >> schieffer: and you believe this was the work of al qaeda and you believe that it was led by foreigners. is that what you're telling us? >> it was plans definitely, was planned by forers, by people who entered the country a few months ago, and they were planning this criminal act since their arrival. >> schieffer: mr. president, is it safe for americans there now? >> the security situation is-- is difficult, not only for americans. even for libbians themselves. we don't know what are the real intentions. of these perpetrators. how they will react. but there is no specific particular concern, danger for americans or any other foreigners. but the situation is not easy to keep stability. yes >> mr. president, will it be safe for the f.b.i. investigators
on america in our history. today people gather across the united states, around the world to remember the tragic events on 9/11. some take part in ceremonies like this. others spent time in quiet reflection and prayer. all of us take a moment to remember again where we were at that fateful moment. here together as one family, we pause to honor and to pray and to remember the 184 lives lost at the pentagon. more than 2700 killed in lower manhattan. and the 40 who perished in that field in pennsylvania on flight 93. these victims families remember those who were lost as mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters, sons and daughters. the family members here today know that the entire nation joins you in mourning the loss of your loved ones. we're honored by your presence and just as your loved ones are heroes for ever, so are all of you. today we also recognize and remember other heroes, those first responders who rushed to the scene behind me into the fire to save lives and help in anyway possible. we owe all of you a special debt. we appreciate all you do it to provide aid and comfort t
the long-term. despite the bumpy path and the disturbing images, it's in the united states fundamental interest that people have the ability to choose their own governments, that the governments be democratic and free. that's in our long-term best interest. we need to reinforce that. >> we are in the middle of a heated presidential campaign. there are different foreign policy visions. that's why we wanted to dedicate the hour today to understand these different views. mitt romney spoke out this week, criticizing the administration, talking about whether the united states was apologizing for some of the initial response to this. these were his comments this week. >> the administration was wrong to stand by a statement sympathizing with those who had breached our embassy in egypt instead of condemning their actions. i think it's a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> our embassies did not stand up for free speech in this initial response to this violence. and the republican charge is that it's weakness on the part of this administration that invites this kin
, criticizing the administration, talking about whether the united states was apologizing for some of the initial response to this. these were his comments this week. >> the administration was wrong to stand by a statement sympathizing with those who had breached our embassy in egypt instead of condemning their actions. i think it's a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> our embassies did not stand up for free speech in this initial response to this violence. and the republican charge is that it's weakness on the part of this administration that invites this kind of chaos that the administration has not been tough enough on radical extremists that are beginning to take root in these countries. how do you respond to that? >> first of all, i think the american people and certainly our diplomats and development experts putting their lives on the line every day around the world expect from our leadership unity in times of challenge. and strong, steady, steadfast leadership of the sort that president obama has been providing. with respect to this, i think,
. >> the united states will not allow iran to acquire a nuclear weapon. we'll do what it takes to prevent that from happening. all options remain on the table. the president has been very clear and that includes the military option. >> shannon: our ambassador to the united nations says the u.s. will stand with israel and do what it takes to stop oran from developing a nuclear weapon, as israeli prime minister netanyahu says iran is 7 to 8 months away from being able to build a nuclear bomb and demands that the united states give a red line to iran. we start with peter doos gee senator john mechanic cane said an hour and-a-half that he thinks the united states is sing exactly the wrong main to the israelis about whether or not we will have their back, if iran gets closer to building a nuclear weapon. >> we keep tells the israelis not to attack, shouldn't we be telling the iranians that that we are with israel and they should back down. >> reporter: the u.s. bamdass dorto the u.n. says that the united states will do whatever it takes to prevent iran from acquiring the nuclear weapon and the
diplomates. including united states ambassador chris stevens in benghazi, libya, in what officials believe was a terrorist attack designed to coincide with the anniversary of september 11th. and joining us dan henninger, mary anastasia o'grady and, with the anti-american protests across the arab world this week, tell us about our standing in that part of the world, and the ferment in arabia? >> well, i think, paul, what's happening here is where essentially we came in when the arab spring began in egy egypt, tunisia and spread to other countries and the feeling at that time that came out the united states couldn't really support any of these movements in the arab spring because quote unquote, we don't know who these people are, which is to say that the united states, and including the state department, just was not that engaged with these countries at that time. now, when you think of how, to what extent egypt or libya since these transitions have been in the news, it's been basically not at all on their own, and still a piece with the obama administration's policy on foreign policy, to lo
right now . socialized medicine in the united states of america. what is that about care so as it about writing the book to it ocd ronnie touched on this because this was one of the central arguments. as i started to write ipod, well, of course obama is redistributing wealth here tell he is a socialist. in fact, i have a section in the book called this a socialist is a big fat liar. i was on with neil cavuto last week. he said to me, come on. look at this title. cassette, tell me what part of that is inaccurate. he is skinny. he goes on the secret burger runs, but he's not taking any rate. he's a socialist. he's lied to the american people day in and day out. prime example, will cut the deficit in half and my first term we all know how that turned out. he inherited a for under $50 billion annual deficit. he has quadrupled the. every year he's been in office he has run between 13 and $17 trillion annual deficit . added five to international debt and just three years. to give it to see -- this white. it took in three years at 5 trillion. for the first 216 years of the republic that is how
bless america, these united states. thank you very much everybody. i hope you get the book. [applause] mike has agreed to take a couple of questions before we get out of here. the first one, right here. >> we did not bring issues. >> where is chick-fil-a? >> it was getting too cold. we will make the diet that i could hear your answer because there were too many -- prius is clicking by. what was your answer about why they don't have any conservative moderators in the upcoming debate? >> it's a perfect metaphor for the machine we are up against. if you expect this is going to be an easy ride for governor romney, it's not in its unbelievable there are going to be liberals who are going to be moderating the debates. the bardot is a so much higher for governor romney then it is president obama and we know that going in and we have to accept that it's tough. >> the next question over here. 's vi of the quick question. my first question is what is this thing between you and hewitt concerning the -- [inaudible] >> apparently you're not you are not supposed to say his name because he moved the
in egypt, say is turkey the model, i say there is no good model. even the united states of america is not a model if you are serious about freedom, dignity and also the power of the state. because i'm ready to talk about -- i will come to that point about separating, you know, the state from religion. but if you separate or distinguish the state from religion, tell me what you put instead of religion. because what we are facing in the west now -- and we all know this as citizens -- i live in europe, you live in the united states of america, and we all know that the problem that we have with our democracies now is not the dramatic decision of religions, but some magic decisions of transnational corporation and economic power that are deciding without us being able to think anything. and we call it democracy, we're still today dealing with powers that are beyond the democratic procedures. the banks, transnational corporations. and we are facing with people who are deciding. for example, in greece, in spain, in italy we have technocrats who are coming to solve the problem. we never el
you would expect the president of the united states to be careful, and the secretary of state. and they are. we should not allow ourselves to be dragged into a theological argument. that is not their job. and then you focus on the real issue. americans have a problem with embassies. since 1979, no country in the world has problems with indices like the americans. -- indices like the americans. -- embassies like the americans. i have respect for all religions. i have a jaundiced view of turbaned men engaging in politics. did you see muslim embassies being stormed to anywhere in the world? >> i know you want to comment on that. i do think -- let's keep it to egypt. there is a feeling that we have lost their way a little bit. there was not that much support for the democratic uprisings in the region. it came to the question of mubarak a little bit belatedly. the perception in the white house, we got dragged into libya in an operation that we were not that enthusiastic about. when you're keeping as far away as possible -- we are keeping as far away as possible from what is going o
to protect the interest in libya. it was a clear it was deal between the united states and france. i think in syria we have to care about the people being killed and not the strategic interest which is i think is the case today. >> i'm a journalist from egypt visiting d.c., and returning back again to cover the i i did i did diad.a. lem that. you said that the islamist in egypt say that the -- [inaudible] this is not the case. [inaudible] to islam and what can be solution to this gap which i think will not be solvent in the upcoming years. we will have -- problems. >> thank you. thank you for this question. first, what are you saying about the muslim hood and what was said was right. that's right. let me finish. he was talking about changing and reforming the individual, the family, and the society and at the end to get the islamic state and this was against the british residence and liberate the country toward the islam state. this is clear. if you look what is happening now within the muslim brotherhood you cannot say it is the same discourse. you can't say this. you might they they are
his distinguished career in the foreign service, he won friends to the united states in far-flung places. he made those people's hopes his own. during the revolution in libya, he risked his life to help protect the libyan people from a tyrant. he gave his life helping them build a better country. people loved to work with him. as he rose through the ranks, they loved to work forehand. he was known not only for his courage, but for his smile. goofy, but contagious. for his sense of fun and that california cool. in the days since the attack, so many libyans, including the ambassador, who is with us today, have expressed their sorrow and solidarity. one young woman, her head covered and her eyes haunted with sadness, held up a handwritten sign that said "thugs and killers do not represent a benghazi or islam." the president of the palestinian authority, who worked closely with chris sent me a letter of remembering his energy and integrity and deploring "an act of ugly terror." many others from across the middle east and africa have offered similar sentiments. this has been a di
of law. >> host: you spoke about day and you criticize the united states, particularly in this area in the book for having what you call a reflexive reaction against any palestinian use of united nations. utilization of the united nations. do you think america is standing in the way of a broader peace effort in the middle east? >> guest: i cannot say that america -- i do say america's standing in the way. what i can say is that it will require a sustained and determined effort by the u.s., working with some of the countries in the region, and europe to bring about peace in the region. it has not been sustained. in fact, i'm not sure i can say there is a peace process today. and i think the u.s. has such a pivotal role to play. and both parties look to u.s. leadership. there were times when you look to see if one had gotten very close. when president putin was trying to get the solution, working at night, on the point it seemed very close. but since then we haven't been that close, and there hasn't been a real effort to bring the parties together. and there are people who are now beg
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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